CoverModule 1.0. Homeostasis, Membranes, Electrophysiology and ANS (Essay Questions)1.1. Homeostasis1.1.1. Homeostasis Defined1.1.2. Homeostatic Control Systems1.1.3. Feedback Response Loop1.2. Cell Transport; Water & Solutes1.2.1. Fluid Compartments1.2.2. Osmosis1.2.3. Diffusion of Solutes1.2.4. Active Transport1.2.5. Bulk Transport1.3. Electrophysiology1.3.1. Ions and Cell Membranes1.3.2. Membrane Potentials1.3.3. Graded Potential1.3.4. Action Potentials1.3.5. Refractory Periods1.3.6. Propagation of an Action Potential1.4. THE SYNAPSE1.5. THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM1.5.1. Organization of the Nervous System1.5.2. Structural Organization of the ANS1.5.3. The SNS and the PNS1.5.4. The Enteric Nervous System1.5.5. Physiology of the ANS1.5.6. Neurotransmitters of the ANS1.5.7. Receptors of the ANS1.5.8. Actions of the Autonomic Nervous System1.5.9. Table of Actions for the SNS and PNS and Some Common DrugsModule 2.0. Skeletal Muscle and Special Senses2.1. Structural Organization of Skeletal Muscle2.2.1. Neuromuscular Junction, Excitation-Contraction Coupling2.2.2. Muscle Contractures and Cramps2.3. Whole Muscle Contraction, Fiber Type, Fatigue and Muscle Pharmacology2.3.1. Motor Units2.3.2. Factors that Influence the Force of Contraction2.3.3. Energy Source for Muscle Contraction2.3.4. Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types2.3.5. Fatigue2.3.6. Muscle Pharmacology2.4. Smooth Muscle2.4.1. Smooth Muscle Contraction2.5. Control of Body Movement2.5.1. Voluntary Control of Muscle2.5.2. Reflexes2.6. Taste and Smell2.6.1. Taste2.6.2. The Sense of Smell2.7. Vision2.7.1. Structure of the Eye2.7.2. Focusing Light on the Retina2.7.3. Converting Light to Action Potentials2.7.4. The Retina2.7.5. Phototransduction2.7.6. Receptive Fields2.8. Hearing and Equilibrium2.8.1. The Nature of Sound2.8.2. The Hearing Apparatus2.8.3. Sound Vibrations to Action Potentials2.8.4. The Sense of Balance and EquilibriumModule 3.0. Cardiovascular System3.1. Structure of the Heart3.1.1. Chambers and Circulation3.2. Cardiac Cell Action Potentials3.2.1. Action Potentials in Cardiac Muscle Cells3.2.2. Action Potentials in Cardiac Autorhythmic cells3.2.3. Cellular Mechanisms of Inotropy and Chronotropy3.3. Electrophysiology of Heart Muscle3.3.1. Heart Conduction System3.3.2. Electrocardiogram (ECG)3.3.3. Abnormal ECG - Current of Injury3.4. The Cardiac Cycle3.4.1. Cardiac cycle3.4.2. Cardiac Measurements and Pressure Volume Loops3.5. Blood vessels and Blood Pressure3.5.1. Arteries and Veins3.5.2. Capillaries3.5.3. Blood Pressure Regulation and Shock3.5.4. Capillary Exchange3.5.5. Myogenic and Paracrine Regulation of Vasoconstriction and Vasodilation3.6. Blood3.6.1. Composition of Blood3.6.2. Hematopoeisis3.6.3. Breaking Down Red Blood Cells3.6.4. HemostasisModule 4.0. Urinary and Respiratory Systems4.1. Function and Structure of the Kidney4.1.1. Urinary System Function4.1.2. Functional Anatomy of the Urinary System4.1.3. The Nephron: Functional Unit of the Kidney4.1.4. The Renal Corpuscle: Bowman's Capsule4.2. Physiology of Urine Production4.2.1. Filtration4.2.2. Renal Clearance4.2.3. Tubular Reabsorption4.2.4. Urine Concentration and Dilution4.2.5. Hormonal Regulation of Urine Production4.3. Acid/Base Balance4.3.1. Buffers4.3.2. Acid/Base Disturbances4.4. The Respiratory System4.4.1. Respiratory System Structure and Function4.4.2. Respiratory Membrane4.4.3. Respiratory pressures and Inspriation/Expiration4.4.4. Alveoli and Surfactant4.4.5. Pneumothorax4.5. Gas Exchange and Transport4.5.1. Gas Laws4.5.2. Partial Pressure Gradients in the Lung4.5.3. Alveolar Gas Equation4.5.4. Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Transport in the Blood4.5.5. Alveolar Ventilation4.5.6. Ventilation/Perfusion Ratio4.6. Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema4.6.1. Respiratory Control by the Medulla Oblongata4.6.2. Chemicals that Regulate VentilationModule 5.0. Digestive, Endocrine and Reproductive Systems5.1. Functional Anatomy of the Digestive System5.1.1. Layers of the Digestive Tract5.1.2. Enteric Nervous System5.1.3. Organs of the Digestive System5.2. Digestion5.2.1. Carbohydrates5.2.2. Proteins5.2.3. Lipids5.2.4. Lipoproteins5.3. Regulation of Digestive Secretions5.4. Endocrine System5.4.1. Overview of the Endocrine System5.4.2. Hormone Receptors5.4.3. Hormones of the Body5.4.4. Other Hormones: Melatonin and Pheromones5.5. The Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland5.5.1. Structure and Function of the Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland5.5.2. The Posterior Pituitary5.5.3. The Anterior Pituitary5.5.4. Growth Hormone5.5.5. Prolactin5.5.6. Thyroid Hormones5.5.7. Adrenal Hormones5.6. Pancreas5.6.1. Insulin and Glucagon5.6.2. Diabetes Mellitus5.7. Reproductive System Anatomy5.7.1. Female Reproductive Anatomy5.7.2. Male Reproductive Anatomy5.7.3. Sexual Development at Puberty5.7.4. Male Reproductive Endocrine Axis5.7.5. Spermatogenesis5.7.6. Female Reproductive System: Oogenesis5.7.7. Ovulation and Fertilization5.7.8. The Ovarian Cycle5.7.9. The Uterine Cycle5.7.10. PregnancyAppendix A. GenderAppendix B. The Placebo EffectB.2.1. The Placebo EffectB.2.2. Examples of the Placebo EffectB.2.3. How do Placebos Work?B.2.4. Are Placebos Ethical?B.2.5. How do we validate actual effectiveness of placebosB.2.6. Tips for evaluating scientific evidenceB.2.7. What about Faith Healings
3.2.3

Cellular Mechanisms of Inotropy and Chronotropy

Changes in inotropy (also known as contractility) are essential to heart function because the heart cannot modify strength by recruiting more fibers or activating motor units. In essence, all the cardiac fibers are activated all the time, so the only way to modify strength is by changing individual fiber contraction strength (shortening length) through the regulation of calcium. The flow chart below identifies the mechanisms by which inotropy can be regulated.

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The flow chart above shows the cellular mechanisms that regulate the inotropic effects of beta 1 stimulation

In addition to altering the contractility (inotropy) of the heart we can also alter the rate at which contractions occur. This effect is known as chronotropy. Below are two charts that illustrate the different effects on both positive and negative chronotropy.

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The primary players in the chronotropic regulation of the heart are the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. The heart is innervated by both the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system. Parasympathetic fibers reach the heart via the Vagus nerve and act on the autorhythmic cells through the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Acetylcholine slows the heart by hyperpolarizing the membrane through G-protein activated inward rectifying K+ channels (GIRK). When acetylcholine binds to the muscarinic G-protein, the beta gamma subunit diffuses to a binding site on a neighboring GIRK channel which opens the channel. Opening the channel results in an outward K+ current, hyperpolarizing the cell and moving the "resting" membrane potential further from threshold, as well as flattening the slope of the pacemaker potential. Both actions increase the time required for the cells to reach threshold. The overall effect is to slow the heart rate. At rest there is constant parasympathetic activity or parasympathetic tone maintaining the resting heart rate slower than the intrinsic rate or the SA node. Sudden loss of parasympathetic stimulation results in an increased heart rate. Strong parasympathetic stimulation alone can decrease heart rate by about 10-20%. Obviously, there is a limit to how slow the heart can beat. The cardiac muscle contractile cells have little or no parasympathetic innervation so parasympathetic stimulation has little effect on the strength of contraction.

Sympathetic fibers reach the heart via sympathetic cardiac nerves and innervate both the autorhythmic cells and the contractile cells. The actions in both tissue types are mediated via β1 adrenergic receptors. In the autorhythmic cells, sympathetic innervation increases heart rate by increasing the slope of the pacemaker potential and lowering the threshold for the voltage gated calcium channels. Sympathetic stimulation of the contractile cells increases the amount of calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, resulting in increased strength of contraction, hence an increase in stroke volume (see chart above).

The endocrine system also influences the actions of the heart, primarily through epinephrine (sometimes referred to as just “E”) and norepinephrine (also referred to as NE) released from the adrenal medulla. These hormones bind to the β1 adrenergic receptors and have the same effect as sympathetic stimulation of the heart.

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Chronotropic Regulation of the Heart by Autonomic Nervous System
The image above was adapted from a Wikimedia commons image by OpenStax College. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/2032_Automatic_Innervation.jpg License: Creative Commons BY 3.0

Videos that might help with the flow charts in this section are found below:

Helpful Video on Inotropy and Lusitroy

Helpful Video on Chronotropy

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