CoverModule 1.0. Homeostasis, Membranes, Electrophysiology and ANS (Essay Questions)1.1. Homeostasis1.1.1. Homeostasis Defined1.1.2. Homeostatic Control Systems1.1.3. Feedback Response Loop1.2. Cell Transport; Water & Solutes1.2.1. Fluid Compartments1.2.2. Osmosis1.2.3. Diffusion of Solutes1.2.4. Active Transport1.2.5. Bulk Transport1.3. Electrophysiology1.3.1. Ions and Cell Membranes1.3.2. Membrane Potentials1.3.3. Graded Potential1.3.4. Action Potentials1.3.5. Refractory Periods1.3.6. Propagation of an Action Potential1.4. THE SYNAPSE1.5. THE AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM1.5.1. Organization of the Nervous System1.5.2. Structural Organization of the ANS1.5.3. The SNS and the PNS1.5.4. The Enteric Nervous System1.5.5. Physiology of the ANS1.5.6. Neurotransmitters of the ANS1.5.7. Receptors of the ANS1.5.8. Actions of the Autonomic Nervous System1.5.9. Table of Actions for the SNS and PNS and Some Common DrugsModule 2.0. Skeletal Muscle and Special Senses2.1. Structural Organization of Skeletal Muscle2.2.1. Neuromuscular Junction, Excitation-Contraction Coupling2.2.2. Muscle Contractures and Cramps2.3. Whole Muscle Contraction, Fiber Type, Fatigue and Muscle Pharmacology2.3.1. Motor Units2.3.2. Factors that Influence the Force of Contraction2.3.3. Energy Source for Muscle Contraction2.3.4. Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types2.3.5. Fatigue2.3.6. Muscle Pharmacology2.4. Smooth Muscle2.4.1. Smooth Muscle Contraction2.5. Control of Body Movement2.5.1. Voluntary Control of Muscle2.5.2. Reflexes2.6. Taste and Smell2.6.1. Taste2.6.2. The Sense of Smell2.7. Vision2.7.1. Structure of the Eye2.7.2. Focusing Light on the Retina2.7.3. Converting Light to Action Potentials2.7.4. The Retina2.7.5. Phototransduction2.7.6. Receptive Fields2.8. Hearing and Equilibrium2.8.1. The Nature of Sound2.8.2. The Hearing Apparatus2.8.3. Sound Vibrations to Action Potentials2.8.4. The Sense of Balance and EquilibriumModule 3.0. Cardiovascular System3.1. Structure of the Heart3.1.1. Chambers and Circulation3.2. Cardiac Cell Action Potentials3.2.1. Action Potentials in Cardiac Muscle Cells3.2.2. Action Potentials in Cardiac Autorhythmic cells3.2.3. Cellular Mechanisms of Inotropy and Chronotropy3.3. Electrophysiology of Heart Muscle3.3.1. Heart Conduction System3.3.2. Electrocardiogram (ECG)3.3.3. Abnormal ECG - Current of Injury3.4. The Cardiac Cycle3.4.1. Cardiac cycle3.4.2. Cardiac Measurements and Pressure Volume Loops3.5. Blood vessels and Blood Pressure3.5.1. Arteries and Veins3.5.2. Capillaries3.5.3. Blood Pressure Regulation and Shock3.5.4. Capillary Exchange3.5.5. Myogenic and Paracrine Regulation of Vasoconstriction and Vasodilation3.6. Blood3.6.1. Composition of Blood3.6.2. Hematopoeisis3.6.3. Breaking Down Red Blood Cells3.6.4. HemostasisModule 4.0. Urinary and Respiratory Systems4.1. Function and Structure of the Kidney4.1.1. Urinary System Function4.1.2. Functional Anatomy of the Urinary System4.1.3. The Nephron: Functional Unit of the Kidney4.1.4. The Renal Corpuscle: Bowman's Capsule4.2. Physiology of Urine Production4.2.1. Filtration4.2.2. Renal Clearance4.2.3. Tubular Reabsorption4.2.4. Urine Concentration and Dilution4.2.5. Hormonal Regulation of Urine Production4.3. Acid/Base Balance4.3.1. Buffers4.3.2. Acid/Base Disturbances4.4. The Respiratory System4.4.1. Respiratory System Structure and Function4.4.2. Respiratory Membrane4.4.3. Respiratory pressures and Inspriation/Expiration4.4.4. Alveoli and Surfactant4.4.5. Pneumothorax4.5. Gas Exchange and Transport4.5.1. Gas Laws4.5.2. Partial Pressure Gradients in the Lung4.5.3. Alveolar Gas Equation4.5.4. Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide Transport in the Blood4.5.5. Alveolar Ventilation4.5.6. Ventilation/Perfusion Ratio4.6. Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema4.6.1. Respiratory Control by the Medulla Oblongata4.6.2. Chemicals that Regulate VentilationModule 5.0. Digestive, Endocrine and Reproductive Systems5.1. Functional Anatomy of the Digestive System5.1.1. Layers of the Digestive Tract5.1.2. Enteric Nervous System5.1.3. Organs of the Digestive System5.2. Digestion5.2.1. Carbohydrates5.2.2. Proteins5.2.3. Lipids5.2.4. Lipoproteins5.3. Regulation of Digestive Secretions5.4. Endocrine System5.4.1. Overview of the Endocrine System5.4.2. Hormone Receptors5.4.3. Hormones of the Body5.4.4. Other Hormones: Melatonin and Pheromones5.5. The Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland5.5.1. Structure and Function of the Hypothalamus and Pituitary Gland5.5.2. The Posterior Pituitary5.5.3. The Anterior Pituitary5.5.4. Growth Hormone5.5.5. Prolactin5.5.6. Thyroid Hormones5.5.7. Adrenal Hormones5.6. Pancreas5.6.1. Insulin and Glucagon5.6.2. Diabetes Mellitus5.7. Reproductive System Anatomy5.7.1. Female Reproductive Anatomy5.7.2. Male Reproductive Anatomy5.7.3. Sexual Development at Puberty5.7.4. Male Reproductive Endocrine Axis5.7.5. Spermatogenesis5.7.6. Female Reproductive System: Oogenesis5.7.7. Ovulation and Fertilization5.7.8. The Ovarian Cycle5.7.9. The Uterine Cycle5.7.10. PregnancyAppendix A. GenderAppendix B. The Placebo EffectB.2.1. The Placebo EffectB.2.2. Examples of the Placebo EffectB.2.3. How do Placebos Work?B.2.4. Are Placebos Ethical?B.2.5. How do we validate actual effectiveness of placebosB.2.6. Tips for evaluating scientific evidenceB.2.7. What about Faith Healings
2.3.3

Energy Source for Muscle Contraction

The ultimate source of energy for muscle contraction is ATP. Recall that each cycle of a myosin head requires an ATP molecule. Multiply that by all of the myosin heads in a muscle and the number of cycles each head completes each twitch and you can start to see how much ATP is needed for muscle function. That estimate doesn’t even consider the greatest consumer of ATP, the SERCA pump or the other major consumer, the Na/K ATPase pump. It is estimated that we burn approximately our entire body weight in ATP each day (150 moles or 75kg; each equivalent ATP is recycled 1550 times a day) so it becomes apparent that we need to constantly replenish this important energy source. For muscle contraction, there are four ways that our muscles get the ATP required for contraction.

  1. Cytosolic ATP: This ATP represents the "floating" pool of ATP, or that which is present and available in the cytoplasm. This ATP requires no oxygen (anaerobic) to make it (because it is already there) and is immediately available but it is short lived. It provides enough energy for a few seconds (1-5 seconds) of maximal activity in the muscle-not the best source for long-term contraction. Nevertheless, for the muscles of the eyes that are constantly contracting quickly, but for short periods of time, this is a great source.
  1. Creatine Phosphate: Once the cytosolic stores of ATP are depleted, the cell calls upon another rapid energy source, Creatine Phosphate. Creatine phosphate is a high energy compound that can rapidly transfer its phosphate to a molecule of ADP to quickly replenish ATP without the use of oxygen. This transfer requires the enzyme creatine kinase, an enzyme that is located on the M-line of the sarcomere. Creatine phosphate can replenish the ATP pool several times, enough to extend muscle contraction up to about 10 seconds. Creatine Phosphate is the most widely used supplement by weight lifters. Although some benefits have been demonstrated, most are very small and limited to highly selective activities.
  1. Glycolysis: Glycolysis, as the name implies, is the breakdown of glucose. The primary source of glucose for this process is from glycogen that is stored in the muscle. Glycolysis can function in the absence of oxygen and as such, is the major source of ATP production during anaerobic activity. This series of chemical reactions will be a major focus in the next unit. Although glycolysis is very quick and can supply energy for intense muscular activity, it can only be sustained for about a minute before the muscles begin to fatigue.
  1. Aerobic or Oxidative Respiration: The mechanisms listed above can supply ATP for maybe a little over a minute before fatigue sets in. Obviously, we engage in muscle activity that lasts much longer than a minute (things like walking or jogging or riding a bicycle). These activities require a constant supply of ATP. When continuous supplies of ATP are required, the cells employ metabolic mechanisms housed in the mitochondria that utilize oxygen. We normally refer to these processes as aerobic metabolism or oxidative metabolism. Using these aerobic processes, the mitochondria can supply sufficient ATP to power the muscle cells for hours. The down side of aerobic metabolism is that it is slower than anaerobic mechanisms and is not fast enough for intense activity. However, for moderate levels of activity, it works great. Although glucose can also be utilized in aerobic metabolism, the nutrient of choice is fatty acids. As described below, slow-twitch and fast-twitch oxidative fibers are capable of utilizing aerobic metabolism.

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